The province has announced that it is partnering with four non-profit organizations to support projects that directly benefit British Columbia’s Francophone community.

This year’s $250,000 investment, managed by the Francophone Affairs Program, will help build a more inclusive province, support early learning and increase French-language resources and make them more accessible.

“Our government is proud of its commitment to enhancing access to French-language services to support the B.C. Francophone community,” said Adrian Dix, Minister of Health and responsible for Francophone Affairs in B.C.

“I’m confident these cultural and early literacy projects will make a substantial and meaningful difference to provide better French services for children and families in B.C.”

The B.C. government, in close co-operation with the Fédération des Francophones de la Colombie-Britannique, invited proposals for projects, programs or services that would address the needs of French-speaking British Columbians.

The projects that will receive financial support this year are:

  • French-language Child Care Centres Development in B.C. ($105,000): The Fédération des Parents Francophones de la C.-B. aims to meet the growing demand for francophone child care by changing the delivery model. The expected result of the project is the creation of 50 new French-language daycare spaces.

 

  • Embracing Indigenous Peoples and Culture ($63,000): The Collège Éducacentre plans to develop an action plan aimed at bringing together staff and students, the francophone and francophile community and Indigenous peoples. With the support of an Indigenous expert, activities will be integrated in all the college’s programs starting with early childhood education and education assistant programs.

 

  • A Place of Gathering – French-language Resource Centre in B.C. ($75,000): L’Alliance française de Vancouver intends to create a multi-media centre and library. The space will enable francophones and francophiles, irrespective of mobility and language proficiency, to retrieve resources and be a place for gathering.

 

  • Les P’tits Matins & Maman Poule ($7,000): There are currently no French early literacy programs in the West Kootenays or in Nelson, despite high demand. The Kootenay Kids Society, in partnership with L’Association des Francophones des Kootenays Ouest, will deliver a parent/child playgroup program and a French early literacy program geared to children six years old and younger.

The funding is part of a five-year commitment made in Budget 2018, totalling $1.25 million for French-language services. This is the third year of funding to support the B.C. Francophonie. 

To learn more about the projects supported from 2018-20, click here.