PORT ALICE, B.C. – The Coastal Fire Centre is keeping its eyes on three “fires of note” on northern Vancouver Island, including two near Zeballos and one near the village of Port Alice.

The Larry Lake wildfire is burning north of Port Alice near Highway 30, the only road into the community. However, a notice from DriveBC confirmed that the road remains open. Drivers should expect 20-minute delays.

The Coastal Fire Centre said there may be intermittent road closures for crews to work on scene, if need be.

The notice from DriveBC, as of 11:09 a.m. Sunday, August 19th.

As of Sunday morning, the fire is estimated to be at 10 hectares in size.

“It’s a fire that’s adjacent to the road into Port Alice, and along it are some hydro lines. It’s very steep ground, and the fire is above the road and there’s danger trees that we’re concerned about, that might come down and impact power,” said Donna MacPherson, a Fire Information Officer with the Coastal Fire Centre.

“We’ve got crews working on the fire today. They did have to have the power shut off for several hours late last night (Saturday) and that was so fallers could work close to the lines and get those trees down out of the way.”

MacPherson said 15 firefighters, with Port Hardy Fire Rescue, are working in the area, along a helicopter and other heavy equipment.

She said fortunately, there is no threat to public safety.

“This is a very remote fire along a forest service road. It’s not near any community,” she said.

“Our big concern though is to try to keep that power stable for people in Port Alice.”

Lightning, according to the Coastal Fire Centre, caused all three of the fires mentioned above.

There are now more than 60 wildfires burning on the North Island, north of Highway 28. The CFC stated that there is no immediate threat to the public or infrastructure because of this fire.

Further information will be added to this report when it becomes available.

Image caption: The flames icon marks the Larry Lake wildfire, burning north of Port Alice. Photo courtesy the Coastal Fire Centre.