We’re coming off a historically hot day.

Fifteen temperature records fell across B.C. yesterday, thanks to a strong ridge of high pressure that’s been with us for the past few days.

On East Vancouver Island, four heat records were set for Sept. 10th.

They include:

Campbell River area – new record of 30 C (beating the old record of 28.9 C set in 1973)

Malahat area – new record of 30.6 C (eclipsing the old record of 27.6 C from 1986)

Nanaimo area – new record of 30 C. (beating the old record of 28.6 C set in 2011)

Port Hardy area – new record of 23.6 C (edging the old record of 22.2 C from 2005)

Records also fell on the Sunshine Coast. They include:  

Powell River area – 27 C (eclipsing the old record of 26.1 C set in 1975)

Sechelt area – 28.9 C (well past the previous record of 26 C from 2007)

With the heat comes a thick layer of wildfire smoke that’s blanketing coastal B.C.

Environment Canada has issued a smoky skies bulletin for Duncan, East Vancouver Island from Nanoose Bay to Fanny Bay, and Nanaimo.

They’ll likely be impacted over the next 24 to 48 hours. 

Wildfire smoke concentrations have continued to drop over the past 24 hours except for a few isolated areas. 

However, smoke forecast models indicate potential for intermittent long-range transport of smoke from the United States in the next day. 

With falling temperatures overnight, temperature inversions in mountain valleys can increase the likelihood of smoke being trapped near the ground. Localized impacts from the Talbott Creek, Woodbury Creek, and Doctor Creek fires continue to be expected.

People with pre-existing health conditions, respiratory infections such as COVID-19, older adults, pregnant women and infants, children, and sensitive individuals are more likely to experience health effects from smoke exposure.

Wildfire smoke is a constantly-changing mixture of particles and gasses which includes many chemicals that can harm your health. 

For more details, click here. https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/air-quality-health-index/wildfire-smoke.html