Here’s your chance to get a sneak peek at the new composting facility being built at the Campbell River Waste Management Centre.

The preliminary design for the $15.5 million dollar project is now ready to be shared with the public.

By attending some upcoming webinars, you can find out more about its designs, ask questions, and provide comments.

Webinar times are:

  • Tuesday, March 16th, noon to 1:00pm
  • Thursday, March 18, 5:00pm to 6:00pm

You can register for it here.

Once it’s built in 2022, the facility will enable curbside organics collection for over 30,000 single-family homes in Campbell River, Comox, Cumberland and Courtenay by fall next year. 

The household organic material will be repurposed into finished compost for agricultural and landscaping uses, diverting around 30 percent of collected waste from our regional landfill.

“Removing organics from the waste stream is essential to manage our solid waste cost effectively, reduce greenhouse gasses and advance our regional waste diversion goals,” explained Cole Makinson, capital projects manager for Comox Strathcona Waste Management Service (CSWMS). 

“We are excited to share our plans for the new regional composting facility with the community and explain how their input will be used to make our diversion goals a reality.

Informed by extensive community input collected in 2020, staff have worked closely with solid waste management engineers, Sperling Hansen, to design a composting facility and transfer station that ensures issues like odour, groundwater, pests and traffic are addressed.

Comments will be summarized and submitted to the BC Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy to support applications for a targeted amendment to CSWM’s Solid Waste Amendment Plan for the Regional Organics Compost Project including construction of the composting facility and supporting transfer station, as well as an operating permit for the composting facility under the Organic Matter Recycling Regulation.

The project is being funded through $6.4 million in grants and $9.1 million from CSWM reserves. 

Operations will be funded through tipping fees. 

CSWMS says cost savings can be realized by removing organics from the waste stream which will prolong the life of our regional landfill.